Technology Information

siRNA Sequences & Methods for Treating Alzheimer Disease

Specific siRNA sequences and the addition of a 5' G have been demonstrated to modulate expression of Alzheimer disease-relevant mutant proteins, Tau & APP in vitro & in vivo.
UIRF Case #:04022


Relevant PublicationsLevel of Development
Technology DescriptionInventor Web Site Link
Patent LinksContact Information
Other Information 

Relevant Publications

Miller VM, Gouvion CM, Davidson BL, Paulson HL. Targeting Alzheimer's disease genes with RNA interference: an efficient strategy for silencing mutant alleles. Nucleic Acids Res. 2004 Jan 30;32(2):661-8.
Link

Level of Development

General: in vitro

Technology Description

Researchers at the University of Iowa have identified a pair of siRNAs, one for the downregulation of mutant Tau (V337M) and the other for the downregulation of mutant amyloid precursor protein (swedish double mutation, K670N/M671L), which could serve as potential therapies in the treatment of Alzheimer disease. Several candidate siRNA sequences were developed that possessed the ability to inhibit expression of each of these mutant genes, and cell culture as well as mouse-based studies were used to identify the most effective sequence for inhibiting the expression of each gene. Studies describing the efficacy of these siRNA sequences also demonstrated the dose-dependent nature of their inhibitory activity. siRNA-mediated inhibition of mutant Tau and mutant APP could be used individually or in conjunction with each other in the clinical setting as needed to treat patients suffering from the effects of Alzheimer disease.

Inventor Web Site Link(s)

http://genetherapy.anatomy.uiowa.edu:8080/genetherapy/introduction.jsp?first=Beverly&last=Davidson&middle=L
http://www.healthcare.uiowa.edu/labs/davidson/

Patent Link(s)

US8329890    US20130065298    

Contact Information

Catherine Koh
catherine-koh@uiowa.edu
319-335-4659

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